Easy Goal Setting!

ChessDoes this sound familiar?

  • You return from convention all excited about the new products and can picture your clients loving them!
  • The company announced a great reward for building your business such as the next incentive trip or a bigger commission check.
  • You have resolved that this is Your Year to Succeed!

Before you have even unpacked your suitcases, that familiar voice in your head starts up again, and you hear, “you’ve felt this way before and you didn’t achieve your goals.”  And, “what makes you think you can do it this time?”  You find yourself questioning yourself yet again.

How can you switch gears?  How can you preserve the enthusiasm and optimism you felt at convention?

Instead of thinking about goals you haven’t achieved, think about the ones you have achieved and ask yourself what did you do to make that goal a reality?

We have all achieved goals in our lives.  For example, did you learn to drive a car?  Make the cheer team in high school?  Get into to college?  Complete college?  Did you get a job?  Have you planned a birthday party, a wedding or another event?  Have you achieve a weight loss goal or run in a 10K race?  Did you move out of your parent’s house into your own home?  All of these are goals you have achieved.  And each goal achieved leaves clues which can be leveraged to find out how to achieve any goal you set for yourself.

The clues you gather can be combined to create your own personal goal achievement strategy.  This strategy will leverage your natural strengths and minimize your weaknesses.  It’s a tool box of what has proven to work for you.  And it can be used over and over again.

How to Create Your Own Personal Goal Achievement Strategy

1)  Make a list of goals achieved. Take out a sheet of paper and create two columns.  On the left, make a list of the goals you have achieved in your life.   Select 5 or 6 goals.  Leave spaces between the goals as you write them on your paper.

2) Ask yourself, “what did it take to achieve that goal?”  In the right column, next to each goal you have achieved, ask yourself the question, “what did it take to achieve this goal?”  Then jot down each idea that comes to you.

Here’s an example:

Goal I Achieved What did it take?
Ride a bike I wanted it very badly – refused to give up.
Learn to wear contact lenses I wanted it very badly – refused to give up.  Worked on it every day.
Get a job in high school I applied for a lot of jobs.
Lose weight in college I tried many different things (increasing my exercise, diets I read about in magazines).  Eventually joined Weight Watchers and found that accountability, support and tracking made a difference.  I kept track by writing down what I was eating at every meal.  Meal planning.
Graduate from college I wanted it very badly and refused to give up.  Worked on it daily.  Created a schedule for myself to make sure I got things done.
Got a job after college I applied for a lot of jobs.  Asked for help.  Worked on it every day.  Refused to give up.
Planned my wedding Help from my fiancé, best friend and family.  Was very organized: kept a lot of lists and checked things off as they were completed.  Reviewed the progress daily and worked on it every day.
Became a Director and cruise earner in my direct sales company I tried many things and learned new skills.  I refused to give up.  Attended team meetings, read books, attended convention. I got support by hiring a coach. I made a plan, reviewed it daily and tracked my progress.

 

3) Review your “what did it take?” column and find the things that worked for you.  Looking at my list I see the following patterns:

  1. I wanted it badly and refused to give up
  2. I tried a lot of different things (different diet and exercise plans, applying for a lot of jobs) until I found what worked.
  3. I got help (Weight Watchers, getting a job after college and planning the wedding)
  4. I created a schedule for myself and worked the schedule
  5. I got organized so I knew what I needed to do each day.
  6. I reviewed my plan daily and worked on it every day.

This is my Personal Goal Achievement Strategy

Once you have created your list, ask yourself how you can apply the ideas on your list to accomplish your current goals.  This is your Personal Goal Achievement Strategy which will enable you to achieve your goals with ease!

Comments

  1. Joanne says:

    Thank you Linda! A clear, concise activity to help locate those tasks we all do brilliantly and focus on those rather than the ones we don’t do!

Speak Your Mind

*

Subscribe without commenting